Letter 6 - Gin to Kei

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Dearest Kei,

By the time you read this, your tomorrow will have passed, but if you have
not done so, I urge you to wave to the Princess. A connection with someone
so placed could be Extremely Beneficial (not to mention the maturity a
connection with a lady with something other than rainbows between her ears
might bring you). 

In particular, it occurs to me (as it hopefully has to you) that she is
probably familiar with her brother-in-law's thoughts on science and
tastes in cantrips. She may also know which aspects of the local
religion are more forgiving, and which less; I should hope you will
consider these matters carefully before lecturing on the nature of the
soul!

Should you survive your audience, you must write At Once to tell me what
the prince is like!
  
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I have done the research into the origins of the word 'radar' that you
demanded, but I am not certain you will approve of the results.

As you suggest, the metaphorical use of 'radar' to mean a person's
internal awareness of her surroundings, made popular by the philosopher
Hawasheidu, derives from the pre-goblin artificer Sumitto Zhono, who
used the term for a magical bowl he created for the general Sinisatu,
which showed the motion of all ships on the surrounding waterways
(although not directly; Hawasheidu probably got the expression from the
writings of the Ineluctable Vishtiu, with which she was undoubtedly
familiar).

What is not commonly mentioned, however, is that Sumitto Zhono did not
invent the word 'radar', but brought it with him from the antescelean
world. According to his journals, the word was formerly used for a
scientific device which had somewhat the same use as his bowl, though
operatings by wholely different principles.

As you can see, despite popular opinion, I have never suffered from a lack
of interest in learning. My teachers find fault with me because what I want
to learn is not necessarily what they wish to teach me. Your gift is
therefore doubly wonderful in my eyes, if not in those of my teacher.

(I must return the journals now, while doing so is only as dangerous as
obtaining them was, but if you should happen to find copies in the
marketplace of petitioners, I would be eternally grateful!)

Someday I should very much like to see the petitioners; I am sure our
local markets compare not at all. (Hebu's Third Rule: "Only that which
dies can ever live.") I can imagine it somewhat from your description,
and from the gifts you have included in the _Selections from the
Writings of the Wise_ (where did you ever find a lethe snifter?), but to
see it all must be marvelous.

Someday, the cosmic injustice of our relative situations will be
redressed, I swear it!

Love,
Your Envious Gin

PS: It is highly unlikely anyone would remember that it is your fault I
know of the bargemen. I also doubt that any of them are quite so buoyant
as I.

PPS: While Omin has the skills required to do well in the trials, I do not
think he has the connections and interest required to serve effectively as
Captain. I do think he is sensible enough to realize this, and if so, he
will leave Hakan in the post until he is ready to strike.

PPPS: The most obvious correlation among the passages you have underlined
is that they all bear in some fashion on the establishment of our refuge
here. I believe they all also were originally penned by students of Nang-u,
although there is some doubt as to the provenence of the quotation
attributed to Tipapan the Red (the one that begins "In high places have
they builded," not the rather low-minded paean to Imichida the Generous).
(If that attribution is in fact in error, then it might also be true that
all of the passages are by authors who were excluded from the Orthodox
Canon by the Convocation of 141C.) If there are other connections to be
drawn, I have not found them yet. 

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PPPPS: I recant that last sentence! I have found one more connection,
not among the passages but linking them all to your letter: they all
were originally penned in either the language of pearls or the cobalt
tongue.
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This file was last modified at 0950 on 29Jan02 by trip@idiom.com.